New research has found that over seven in 10 workers believe that their career has had a negative impact on their self-esteem.

The findings, collated by CV-Library, found that over half of UK workers feel that they place too much importance on their job – with inadequacy and mistakes also making the nation’s workers feel bad.

Lee Biggins, Founder and Managing Director of CV-Library, believes that the study shows the impact of the work on the nation’s mental health.

He said: “In a world where awareness around mental health and wellbeing is now more prevalent than ever, our latest findings shed some light on the true impact that work can have on employees’ self-esteem. As professionals, we always want to perform to the best of our abilities and there can often be incidents in the workplace that make us question our performance and goals.

“However, it’s important to remind your staff are only human and we cannot always predict what may happen throughout our careers.”

The CV-Library study found that the top five facets of working life that made workers feel bad were: not feeling skilled enough; making a silly mistake; being made redundant; being turned down for a promotion; and not making it through probation.

This year alone, HR Grapevine has shared stories on workers who’ve had their lives impact, for the worse. There is the Google employee who sued after daily harassment from male colleagues and staff who’ve quit because of a lack of trust.

Furthmore, a separate study by Swinton Group found that only 34% of men and 24% of women feel very confident at work.

However, it’s not all bad. On the next page, HR Grapevine, with help from the Stylist, has collated seven ways to improve your confidence at work.

Positive thinking

If you’re dreading that presentation, or presenting research – or, even an upcoming one-to-one with your boss, stop thinking of the worst case scenario. Instead, flip the situation on it’s head and predict what the best thing to happen may be and visualise that.

Act ‘as if’

This one is an alternative to ‘fake it until you make it’. Think and act as if you are that person. If you want a promotion, think about the job your manager does and act as if you’re making some of those decision.

Find your comfort zone

If you’ve got a daunting day, ahead of you, find the habits that make you feel better. If that’s your favourite playlist, a hot cup of coffee or a chat with a loved one or friend, do it.

Don’t compare

There will always be someone at work who is more successful than you. In your mind, they’ll have more and have done more. Therefore, stop comparing yourself as you’ll only feel worse about your own achievements. Instead focus on what you do and how you can improve to reach your own goals.

And, if you can’t stop comparing yourself, ask that person whom you admire to find out how they do things. Chances are they won’t be weirded out – they’ll be honoured that you’re interested.

Don’t jump ahead

Rather than setting an impossible to complete task – “I want to be CEO of my firm” – set achievable goals. These could be, I want to complete my next project to an impressive standard, I want to get promoted within a couple of years, or I want to expand my network.

The bigger goals will come as you achieve the smaller steps.

Ask for help

Many of us feel that asking for help is indicative of weakness or failure. However, asking for expertise is, in many cases, the best thing to do and it can relieve anxiety about a task. Furthermore, it’ll improve the bonds between you and the person your asking for help, bolstering your support network for when you need help again.

Learn from mistakes

To improve at work confidence, ensure that you jot down mistakes and write down how you solved that particular situation. Whatever the outcome and situation, always reflect on what went well and what didn’t – even if the situation is painful.

It’ll improve your confidence for the future, as you’ll know the solution for a particular issue and you’ll even be able to help out your colleagues if they come up against a similar issue.

 

 

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